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Bulletin Board

The Graphic Designer Reworking Fashion’s Most Iconic Logos

tom is not a boy

Text: Maisie Skidmore

Reilly has made a social experiment out of mish-mashing the high and the low together – and the likes of Silvia Venturini Fendi and Kris Van Assche are fans

 

Courtesy of Reilly  

Courtesy of Reilly  

Have we reached peak logomania? Over the past few years we’ve seen the very best of branding shaved into heads at Fendi, logomarks splashed all over bags, bra-straps and T-shirts at Loewe, Dior and Gucci, and presidential campaign identities reworked at Balenciaga – and that’s to say nothing of the branding bonanza that that house’s artistic director Demna Gvasalia takes great pleasure in hosting with Vetements.

Away from the catwalk, however, things are taking a rather different turn in the hands of Reilly, a London-based, Scottish-born graphic designer and art director who for several years now, has been toying cheerily with the logos which we see day in, day out – reworking them with fashion’s greatest mainstays. “I’m just trying to get people to look at things differently,” he explains over the phone, when we ask him how a cheeky experiment came to be an ongoing project for him. “We see these symbols every day, so frequently that I thought, ‘you know what? I’m going to mash them up by putting super famous brands with super famous brands that are totally unrelated’. I just want to make people look at them and go, ‘what?!’”

This he does, and indeed has been doing for years, morphing Margiela in McDonalds, Lanvin into Lidl, and Stella McCartney into Stella Artois. Things took an upturn recently, however, when Belgian fashion designer and artistic director of Dior Homme Kris Van Assche came across a cheeky reworking of Dior with the Nike swoosh, and gleefully posted it on his own Instagram. “He was like ‘this is hilarious!’” Reilly remarks, evidently disbelieving, still, “but the next morning my Instagram was practically crackling – lots of people had seen it and reposted it, thinking it was real! It ended up being quite crazy.”

 

Cortesy of Reilly  

Cortesy of Reilly  

Given the current proliferation of fake news and high-low collaborations, Reilly saw the fascination with his playful subversion of fashion branding as an opportunity to take things even further, and continued sharing his tongue-in-cheek combinations with the world. He was surprised to find something of a fashion following among those liking and sharing: “Silvia Fendi, she posted the Fendi-Fila one – she thought that was really funny.”

What does the willingness of today’s most esteemed brands to have a laugh at themselves say about the state of pop culture, we wonder? “I think people have really lightened up,” Reilly says. “Five years ago they would probably have been on me like a ton of bricks, but I feel now brands like that idea of fooling around – it’s not so uptight. This is the age we live in now – everything is so easy, and accessible, and ready.” This kind of experimentation has seen him invited to lecture at the RCA, and to create work directly for brands, among other projects. “We’ve got so much going on, at the moment globally, in the markets, and politically, and in warzones and so on that people just want a tiny bit of escapism,” he muses. “Maybe that is looking on a screen at something that makes you laugh for ten seconds.” It’s a welcome moment of respite, we suggest. And maybe as things in the world start to get back on track, stuff like this will die down, start to level itself out.” For the moment, though, he’s keen to continue playing.

 

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Source: AnOther Mag

CAN RECYCLED PLASTIC CLOTHING DO MORE HARM THAN GOOD?

tom is not a boy

It seems the oceans have become a new textile hunting ground for many top brands including Adidas, G-Star Raw, Patagonia and others. These companies have been creating clothing from plastics collected from the oceans, which is then recycled into fibres. Adidas, for example, has combined Ocean Plastics with a zero waste 3D-printing technique to manufacture a stylish athletic shoe as part of their partnership with Parley for the Oceans, an initiative that encourages repurposing ocean waste and raising awareness of our increasingly dire plastics problems.

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Owner of Bionic Yarn, a textile company that bases its production on reclaimed ocean plastics, Pharrell Williams has launched his third collection with G-Star RAW, which features urban streetwear made from this innovative fabric.  The line includes perfectly cut jeans,  jackets, T-shirts and hoodies – none of which you would imagine ever existed in plastic form at one point.

 

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Yet another eco-minded fashion label using recycled plastics is Outerknown, launched by surfer legend Kelly Slater, who designed a line of 100% recyclable clothing made from reclaimed fishing nets. His motivation is noble “Single-use plastics all through the ocean, degrading, turning into little bits that are all eaten by the sea life, and they’re dying because their stomachs are full of stuff,” Slater said in an interview with CNN. But little did he know that the very clothing he was creating with the aim of ending such pollution may well be exacerbating it.

 

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Teeny Particles

Researchers have found that these well intended brands may be doing more harm than good by introducing recycled plastic clothing into the wash cycle. Apparently, microfibers — tiny synthetic threads less than 1 mm in size — may actually be the biggest source of plastic in the ocean. And many of them may come from simply washing synthetic clothing.

Earth Island reports that Dr. Mark Browne, an ecologist and postdoctoral fellow at the National Center of Ecological Analysis and Synthesis in Santa Barbara, California, states that every time a synthetic garment — that is, anything made from non-organic fibres – goes through the spin and rinse cycle in a washing machine, it sheds a large number of plastic fibers. Most washing machines don’t have filters to trap these miniscule microfibers, and neither do sewage plants that are responsible for removing contaminants. So every time the water drains from a washing machine, plastic filaments are swept through the sewers and eventually end up in the ocean.

In 2011, Browne published a paper in Environmental Science & Technology stating that one single synthetic garment can produce more than 1,900 microfibres per wash, with fleeces being the worst offenders – but even smooth synthetics like nylon shed significantly. Compound billions of people washing billions of garments billions of times in a year, and the effects are clearly effects are devastating.

 

But the news is worse. We all know plastic is toxic in itself, but studies show it can actually absorb other toxins, like pesticides or organic pollutants such as polychlorinated biphenyls. When microplastics enter the ocean, they work their way up the food chain, being eaten by bottom feeders swallowed by bigger fish…and eventually, they end up back on our plate. We mentioned this issue in the past, but as related to the toxic effects that microbeads in beauty products were having on the ocean. Now it turns out that fashion is having the same effect.

One of the main campaigners against microbeads – Five Gyres –  is now also turning their efforts to all microfibres in the oceans. The results of one of their most recent studies concludes that there are over 5 trillion pieces of plastic in the ocean, collectively weighing more than 250,000 tons. With a global population of 7.2 billion people, that means there are about 700 plastic pieces in the ocean for every person on Earth.  With an ever growing and wealthier population, Five Gyres predicts that another 33 billion tons of plastic will be added to the environment by 2050.

Despite much evidence pointing to the dangers of producing clothing from synthetics, the head researcher of the study, Dr Mark Browne says he’s had a hard time getting textile companies to listen. He launched a project called Benign by Design, a research project aiming to determine and remove features of textiles that have negative impacts on humans and the environment, but when he asked for support for this worthy cause by the fashion industry, he was stonewalled by all but one – the truly superlative eco-luxury brand Eileen Fisher. Other brands including Patagonia, Polartec, and Nike rejected , and even the ostensibly eco-friendly Patagonia told Browne his extensive research was still ” too preliminary” to justify company funding.

Better Solutions

While pressuring brands to support Browne’s initiative is certainly a step in the right direction, given the fact that most clothing is actually made from synthetics, there have been calls to solve the microfibre problem by introducing screens to washing machines that would filter the plastic particles out, but these would have to be fitted to new machines, and by the time these became widespread, the problem will have become even graver.

Another measure we can take is to recycle ocean plastic into items that needn’t be washed frequently, like furniture. One design house who is doing this to perfection is Studio Swine. Featured recently in an exhibition at London’s Selfridges department store, these innovators are gaining a strong reputation for clever recycling of trash into objects for the home.

 

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What truly matters is that the clothing industry is willing to take the findings of environmental scientific research seriously and apply it to textile sourcing. This is true not only for the ‘eco’ brands based on recycled plastics, but also for any clothing manufacturer that uses acrylic, polyester and other textiles that shed toxic microfibres. And ultimately, it’s up to us to make well informed decisions about our fashion purchases, and to think twice every time we buy something that may end up as ocean plastic in the first place.

 

source:  

EluxeMagazine 

Butcher Billy's Dark Tales From The Black Mirror

tom is not a boy

Butcher Billy takes what is considered pop culture from a variety of sources – music, comics, movies, games etc – and mashes them all together to come up with something that draws on nostalgia, while, at the same time, provides the audience with a fresh take on a familiar scene. He’s not even going to apologize. It’s that sort of rule-breaking, devil may care, chaotic attitude that inspires Billy’s art.

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What if, in an alternate universe, the cult tv show Black Mirror had been inspired by a series of old school comic books from the 70's? Horror, suspense, crime, romance... anything goes. This is a 'work in progress' project: every one of the 13 episodes from 3 seasons will be reimagined by the twisted mind of Butcher Billy.       

 

 

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References:  

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British Museum to Solve Mystery of Golden Treasure Found in Piano

tom is not a boy

A Broadwood and Sons Piano. Image courtesy Wikimedia Commons

A Broadwood and Sons Piano. Image courtesy Wikimedia Commons

A hoard of golden treasure has been found inside a vintage piano in England, and the British Museum is now heading a search for the origins of the mysterious cache, known as the “piano hoard.”

Coroners in Shropshire, a county in West Midlands near Birmingham, are asking anyone with information of who originally hid the golden items to come forward.

They could be coins, jewelry, or other gold objects. The museum and owners—the police are not involved—are keeping the details under wraps to avoid false claims, but the Telegraphspeculates that the items are coins pre-dating the year 1900.

A statement from the British Museum reads, “The finds are highly unusual in nature being substantially made of gold and appear to have been deliberately hidden within the last 110 years.”

When it comes to the provenance of the piano itself, a little bit more information is known. It was made by London’s Broadwood & Sons in 1906, and was first bought by a music shop in Essex, who sold it to private owners.

It is unknown who owned or played it from 1906 and 1983, but when the owner died, it was sold at the estate sale. Its current owners took the piano for a tuning last month, when the gold stash was finally found.

Experts guess that a previous owner of the piano filled it with the material wealth, and failed to tell anyone about it.

Meanwhile, a search is underway, led by the British Museum’s Portable Antiquities Scheme, an effort to catalogue objects found unintentionally in England. It employs 37 finds liaison officers across the country, including Peter Reavill, the Shropshire officer who has been assigned to the case of piano gold.

Reavill says he hopes to find out who the original owner of the items was, and return them to the family.

 

by Alyssa Buffenstein via artnet

Amazing Artists’ Christmas Cards

tom is not a boy

From Herbert Bayer to Jean Cocteau, a brilliant new book reveals the festive correspondence of some of modern art’s greatest pioneers

 

Pages 28 and 29, Herbert Bayer, Untitled, 1941. Montage-photolithograph with silkscreen and lithograph on paper 6.25 x 9 in.© 2016 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn

Pages 28 and 29, Herbert Bayer, Untitled, 1941. Montage-photolithograph with silkscreen and lithograph on paper 6.25 x 9 in.© 2016 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn

Nothing beats a handmade Christmas card, except perhaps one made by a world renowned artist. And few people received as many of these as Monroe Wheeler, director of exhibitions and publications at the Museum of Modern Art from 1939 to 1967. Wheeler’s passion for publishing began young: he received his first printing press on his 18th birthday and before assuming his role at the New York museum had spent six influential years in Europe where he befriended some of the most famous artists of the day, including Picasso, Renoir and Chagall. His gift for friendship also extended to other areas of the art world – from museum administrators to trustees to collectors – a knack that served him extremely well at MoMA. “It was as a diplomat, an organiser and a publisher, not as a scholar, that he made his career in the museum,” editor and cultural historian Russell Lynes once noted. “If they need someone charmed, they have Monroe to do it.” During his tenure there he oversaw the publication of more than 350 visual arts books, “[creating] a whole new public for the Modern,” in the process (in the words of former MoMA director Richard Oldenburg).

 

Alfonso Ossorio, Crucifix, date unknown © 2016 Ossorio Foundation, Southampton, NY. Reproduced with the permission of the Ossorio Foundation, Sally Vanasse and Nicole A. Vanasse
Alfonso Ossorio, Crucifix, date unknown
© 2016 Ossorio Foundation, Southampton, NY. Reproduced with the permission of the Ossorio Foundation, Sally Vanasse and Nicole A. Vanasse

Suffice to say that many of the greatest modernists of the 20th century held him in high esteem, deeming him worthy of a thoughtful Christmas card each holiday season. Wheeler treasured these artworks during his lifetime and following his demise in 1987 his devoted companion Anatole Pohorilenko preserved them among what is now known as the Monroe Wheeler Archive: a treasure trove of correspondence and ephemera that was rediscovered in an attic after Pohorilenko’s death in 2014. Thankfully for the general public, the best of these private shows of affection have now been made public, courtesy of a new book from publisher Daylight, titled Season’s Greetings, which is – Wheeler would be pleased to know – a beautifully designed tome. Among the artists whose cards made the cut are such mid-century modern pioneers as Jean Cocteau and Herbert Bayer, photography luminaries André Kertész and Cecil Beaton, as well as Georges Braques and Alexander Calder. 

Pages 20-21, André Kertész Untitled, 1956 Gelatin silver print with gummed star on card stock 6.5 x 4.75 in. on 7 x 10 in. card stock © 2016 André Kertész Estate
Pages 20-21, André Kertész Untitled, 1956 Gelatin silver print with gummed star on card stock 6.5 x 4.75 in. on 7 x 10 in. card stock
© 2016 André Kertész Estate
Bernard Waldmann, Untitled, 1959
Bernard Waldmann, Untitled, 1959

Each of the artists’ cards bear telling signs of their maker and his or her enduring preoccupations at the time of their creation. Cocteau’s, for example, depicts a wonderful handdrawn harpist in ink and oil pastel, etched in his signature illustrative style on writing paper from the Villa Santo Sospir in St-Jean-Cap-Ferrat, France, where the artist resided for a number of years. As the now-famous story goes, Cocteau was invited to dine there by 34-year-old Parisian socialite Francine Weisweiller, who had recently acquired the house. Enticed by its blank white walls, the creative polymath declared that he would decorate it, spending the next six months covering the walls in tattoos, as well as mosaics and tapestries of his own design and even painting the wardrobes. Mission complete, he liked the house so much that he stayed there for the next 11 years, sending cheerful greetings to his friend Wheeler for Christmas 1959.

Pages 52-53, Artist Unknown (Georges and Peggy Bernier) Untitled, date unknown. Mixed media, offset lithograph on paper 3.25 x 4.5 in. (closed) 3.25 x 10.5 in. (open) © 2016 Estate of Monroe Wheeler / Courtesy Vincent Cianni, Newburgh, NY
Pages 52-53, Artist Unknown (Georges and Peggy Bernier) Untitled, date unknown. Mixed media, offset lithograph on paper 3.25 x 4.5 in. (closed) 3.25 x 10.5 in. (open)
© 2016 Estate of Monroe Wheeler / Courtesy Vincent Cianni, Newburgh, NY
Kathryn and Gerhard Gerlach, Merry Christmas, Happy New Year, date unknown
Kathryn and Gerhard Gerlach, Merry Christmas, Happy New Year, date unknown


Alexander Calder’s card on the other hand is much more aerodynamic – just as one would expect from the master of mobiles. Sent to Wheeler in 1968, the gloriously geometric masterpiece takes the form of a tripartite collage crafted from card. The outer panels bear two cut-out creatures: a pillar-box-red bird with a spectacularly curly string plumage (who, incidentally, features on the book’s cover) on the left and a slithering green snake on the right. An inverted metal relief of the two creatures appears discreetly in the central panel, over the top of which Calder has scrawled his festive tidings in black painted capitals, topping the central ‘A’ with a red paper circle dangling on white string, which playfully resembles a balloon.

Herbert Bayer Untitled, (Christmas Tree), date unknown
Herbert Bayer Untitled, (Christmas Tree), date unknown

Other cards are imbued with potent historical symbolism, such as that of Austrian-American graphic designer, painter, architect and photographer Herbert Bayer who sent the publisher a poster-like montage-photolithograph by way of a festive greeting in 1941. The presence of World War II is keenly felt in the work: one of the two outstretched, eye-bearing hands is covered in snow, the other in blood. Bayer had, in fact, been living in Berlin in the mid-1930s, working as an art director for Vogue, but had suffered at the hands of the Nazis when his work was included in their notorious Degenerate Art exhibition forcing him to flee. By 1938 however, the artist had comfortably settled in New York, where he and Wheeler met and thereafter began to collaborate, Wheeler often calling upon his design skills, and the duo frequently discussing war and politics in their regular correspondence. But whatever shape or form the cards take, one thing is certain: a lot of time, effort and love went into their realisation – and what better present can you give than that?

Pages 28 and 29, Herbert Bayer, Untitled, 1941. Montage-photolithograph with silkscreen and lithograph on paper 6.25 x 9 in. © 2016 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn
Pages 28 and 29, Herbert Bayer, Untitled, 1941. Montage-photolithograph with silkscreen and lithograph on paper 6.25 x 9 in.
© 2016 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn
Page 59, Ivan Chermayeff Untitled, 1963 Lithograph on card stock 11 x 9.25 in. © 1963 Ivan Chermayeff, New York
Page 59, Ivan Chermayeff Untitled, 1963 Lithograph on card stock 11 x 9.25 in.
© 1963 Ivan Chermayeff, New York
Jacques Lipchitz, Untitled (Merry Christmas), 1947 All Rights Reserved, Estate of Jacques Lipchitz. Hanno D. Mott, New York
Jacques Lipchitz, Untitled (Merry Christmas), 1947
All Rights Reserved, Estate of Jacques Lipchitz. Hanno D. Mott, New York
Luis Felipe Noé/Galeria Bonino, New York To Be Together, c. 1966 © 2016 Luis Felipe Noé, Tacuarí, Caba, Argentina
Luis Felipe Noé/Galeria Bonino, New York To Be Together, c. 1966
© 2016 Luis Felipe Noé, Tacuarí, Caba, Argentina
Max Weber, Untitled, 1950 © 2016 Estate of Monroe Wheeler / Courtesy Vincent Cianni, Newburgh, NY
Max Weber, Untitled, 1950
© 2016 Estate of Monroe Wheeler / Courtesy Vincent Cianni, Newburgh, NY
Miguel Covarrubias, Untitled, date unknown © 2016 Estate of Monroe Wheeler / Courtesy Vincent Cianni, Newburgh, NY
Miguel Covarrubias, Untitled, date unknown
© 2016 Estate of Monroe Wheeler / Courtesy Vincent Cianni, Newburgh, NY
Nathan Gluck Untitled, 1962 © 2016 Nathan Gluck / Courtesy Luis De Jesus Los Angeles
Nathan Gluck Untitled, 1962
© 2016 Nathan Gluck / Courtesy Luis De Jesus Los Angeles
Pierre Le-Tan Indoors, Outdoors, 1980 Card © 1980 Museum of Modern Art, New York. All rights reserved Pierre Le-Tan, Paris
Pierre Le-Tan Indoors, Outdoors, 1980
Card © 1980 Museum of Modern Art, New York. All rights reserved Pierre Le-Tan, Paris
Robert Andrew Parker, Untitled, date unknown © 2016 Robert Andrew Parker
Robert Andrew Parker, Untitled, date unknown
© 2016 Robert Andrew Parker
Shanti Dave Untitled, date unknown © 2016 Shanti Dave, New Delhi
Shanti Dave Untitled, date unknown
© 2016 Shanti Dave, New Delhi
William Pahlmann Bill Pahlmann wishes you a fine holiday, 1961 © 2016 William Palmann / Courtesy of Hagley Museum and Library
William Pahlmann Bill Pahlmann wishes you a fine holiday, 1961
© 2016 William Palmann / Courtesy of Hagley Museum and Library

Text by: Daisy Woodward via AnotherMag

The Myth of the Millennial as Cultural Rebel

tom is not a boy

 

We have two popular historians to blame for our profound misunderstanding of young people’s lifestyle choices.

 

August 30, 2016

If you have read anything about young people in recent years, you could be forgiven for believing that we are living through a cultural revolution, unprecedented in its destructiveness and self-regard. Millennials don’t just reject the music, art, or clothes of their parents; they also reject the older generation’s major sources of economic and spiritual well-being, like home ownership, cars, even sex. They’d rather pay to “access” music and movies than to buy them, and they don’t aspire to steady jobs (long live the gig economy!) or vacations. Their lifestyle choices are informed either by an admirable anti-consumerist streak or by a lazy reluctance to be weighed down by success and owning stuff. They’ve even killed the napkin industry.

None of this is true. The idea that these “trends” in consumption are driven primarily by cultural preferences, rather than a faltering economy and ever-rising costs of living, is difficult to believe, but that’s the prevailing narrative. Business Insider’s story blaming millennials for a slump in the sales of paper napkins is a perfect example of why that interpretation is absurd. The article contends that, like eating cereal, buying paper napkins is too much work for millennials. Similarly, TheWashington Post has pointed out that young people have found ways to make the paper napkin’s rival, the paper towel, look chic on social media, the only thing they really care about. Neither article mentions that millennials are the first cohort in American history to enjoy lower living standards than their parents. Not buying napkins is a pretty painless way to save money.

Which explanation seems more likely? Do we use Zipcar because we are ideologically committed to sharing, or because car ownership is still out of reach for a lot of people and renting piecemeal is the next best thing? Does amarried couple decide to live with roommatesbecause of our generational “openness to communal living” or because people in New York face impossible rents? Do people stop using napkins because of unshakeable cultural convictions, or because they’re a waste of money? If the new generation were really waging war on their forebears’ way of life, I doubt they’d start with the disposable table settings.

There’s nothing like being told precarity is actually your cool lifestyle choice.Still, the list of such articles is infuriatingly long. Fusion’s Patrick Hogan counted 47 institutions and industries that millennials have been accused of destroying so far, including credit, car culture, the American Dream, relationships, and golf. Of course, in each of these cases, there is a real story to be told: Yes, young people are buying less on credit; yes, car sales are down; and, not surprisingly, 48 percent of economically squeezed under-30s don’t buy into the uplift of the American Dream, according to one poll.

 

But the language of these articles tells another story on top of those, one that isn’t backed up by any evidence at all: that millennials are “killing” those things, choosing to eliminate them from our shared life. That’s a deeply frustrating story to keep reading, when headlines of “Millennials are killing the X industry” could just as easily read “Millennials are locked out of the X industry.” There’s nothing like being told precarity is actually your cool lifestyle choice.

It’s likely, however, that we’re stuck with this narrative. The media decided what millennial culture and values would be decades ago, before some of us were even born. William Strauss and Neil Howe, a popular-historian duo, coined the term “millennial” in 1987, to refer to the children who would graduate high school in the year 2000. And in their book Millennials Rising, published in 2000, they saw fit to describe the character of this newborn generation.

Millennials Rising gave us the myth that millennials are hard-wired to share, describing this generation as optimistic “team players” who “gravitate towards collective power.” The authors also laid the groundwork for a thousand think-pieces attacking “coddled youth” and “trigger warnings,” cautioning that millennials in their upbringing would be “the most watched-over generation in memory.” One reviewer prophesied that the millennial college experience would “give a new meaning to the word ‘overprotective.’” The same reviewer also worried that millennials “could be led astray by a demagogue or use technology in Orwellian ways.” It’s as though the moral outrage of the 2010s had been written in advance, before there were any facts to get wrong.


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 Millennials Rising was just one part of a much bigger theory Strauss and Howe had developed about generational flux. As Howe put it in a C-SPAN interview, “Every generation belongs to one of four life-cycle types that seems to repeat in the same order over time.” There are generations of prophets, followed by nomads, heroes, then artists. The G.I. generation—whom they are fond of calling “the greatest generation”—are, obviously, heroes; a so-called Silent Generation are artists; the Boomers are prophets; Gen X they deem a lost cohort of nomads; and millennials are destined to be heroes like their war-era grandparents. In their 1991 book Generations: The History of America’s Future, they parceled the country’s history neatly into 18 generations, and went so far as to predict the American character up to the year 2069.

Despite skepticism about this fatalistic view of history, Strauss and Howe’s thinking about generations—and particularly about millennials—had outsize influence. While promoting Generations, Strauss boasted that “Al Gore is sending this book to every member of Congress, he believes in it so much.” TheWashington Post’s review marveled at the word-of-mouth publicity the book had garnered. The authors expounded their theory in an 18-page feature in TheAtlantic, and saw their ideas recycled in endless turn-of-the-millennium columns about the future of the country’s youth.

Perhaps their most influential champion was David Brooks. He drew on Strauss and Howe’s work in his own disquisition on the country’s youth, his 2001 essay “The Organization Kid.” Brooks’s review in TheNew York Times of Millennials Rising sums up how a lot of powerful journalists have taken the book. He dismissed its theory of cycles as junk history, but he liked that it articulated misgivings about young people that he had vaguely intuited himself: “If you get away from the generational mumbo jumbo,” Brooks reasoned, the book “illuminates changes that really do seem to be taking place.” The myth of the sharing-obsessed, optimistic but oversensitive millennial had taken hold, well before she had taken her turn on the generational stage.

Strauss and Howe spread their ideas not just through the media but also through the world of big business. In 1999, they founded LifeCourse Associates, a company that advises corporations on how they can understand the character of different generations and tailor their pitches to them. As Strauss explained on Book Notes, they always intended their theory to work as a marketing tool. He hoped salesmen would read “the section of our book that will certainly be the most controversial with historians”—the part that claimed to foretell the tastes of an emerging generation of consumers.

After Strauss died in 2007, Howe continued to run LifeCourse Associates with three employees, giving about 60 speeches per year, TheChronicle for Higher Educationreportedin 2009. Clients include big media companies (CNN, Hearst), universities, the U.S. Army, and companies like Ford and PepsiCo. In April 2015, LifeCourse Associates prepared a reportfor the Congressional Institute on how the GOP could best connect with millennials voters, whom they were still calling “special,” “sheltered,” “teamworking,” and “confident.” In business as well as government, we’re deeply invested in a view of today’s young adults that was formulated before they even grew up.

 

There’s a final part of Strauss and Howe’s prophesy that explains why we’re so wedded to the idea that millennials are actively “killing” off industries. The authors of Millennials Rising were what you might call self-hating Boomers. They hoped for a new generation that would rescue society from the excesses of their own. Strauss felt out of step with his peers, dismayed by their attitude. At Harvard in the 1960s, he saw riots and strikes: “Although I didn’t participate in that I saw it and it saddened me,” he recalled, “I was well aware of what my peers were doing to attack the institutions of their elders.” Howe shared his co-author’s disappointment:

  • During the 1970s when everyone expected the boomers to become a great new political force in American politics, they instead entered a political remission. By 1980 they had become the yuppie, and they concentrated on a certain cultural perfectionism. Rather than involving themselves with politics, they detached themselves from institutional life, from having families, from having steady

Both authors put their hope in the future. “Today’s cute Millennial tots,” they wrote somewhat sentimentally in a 1991 issue of American Demographics, “could become the next great cadre of civic doers and builders.” In a 1992 USA Today article, titled “Who Will Save the World?”, Howe stated: “Boomers can’t make things work. They have to get their Millennials to do it.”

Strauss and Howe even chose the name “millennials” over alternatives like “Generation.com” and “Echo Boomers” to emphasize unprecedented newness. If we don’t participate in the housing market or indulge the Boomer urge to measure success by a brand-new car, bought on lavish credit, it must be because we are forging a previously untraveled path away from the world of our parents.

And what do less self-critical boomers think of us? They can’t bear the idea that we’re not tearing up the script just like they did. They can’t understand that sometimes change happens for reasons other than cultural rebellion. Brooks lamented in “The Organization Kid” that “the most sophisticated people in preceding generations”—by which I assume he means his generation—“were formed by their struggle to break free from something. The most sophisticated people in this one aren’t.”

Of course, young people have broken free from a lot of things in the 15 years since Brooks wrote that, not least in their willingness to look beyond the establishment wing of the Democratic Party for a politics that matches their own experience more closely. As the support for Bernie Sanders this election cycle has shown, young people want to see a reckoning with precarity and inequality. The myth that underemployed, poorly housed young people are joyfully engaged in a project of creative destruction misrepresents our economic reality. But only if we can finally be said to have liberated ourselves from napkins, houses, and sex, will we have given the Boomers something to be proud of.

 

 

Via https://newrepublic.com/authors/laura-marsh

10 Must-See Events and Artworks at Bushwick Open Studios

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Jacklyn Brown, Pot of Gold from the "Catch Me If You Can" series, on view in her studio at 1717 Troutman Street during Bushwick Open Studios. Courtesy of Jacklyn Brown.

Jacklyn Brown, Pot of Gold from the "Catch Me If You Can" series, on view in her studio at 1717 Troutman Street during Bushwick Open Studios. Courtesy of Jacklyn Brown.

There’s a chill in the air, but things are about to heat up in Bushwick, which hosts the first October edition of its annual Bushwick Open Studios art bash this weekend.

 

Now in it’s tenth edition, BOS has moved from June to October in an effort to put the focus back on one-on-one interactions with the artists, who are the event’s signature attraction. This means no more NEWD art show, (reportedly) fewer large-scale parties, and more unfettered access to the spaces where artists hone their craft.

Related: Beloved Brooklyn Art Event Bushwick Open Studios Postponed to October

There’s a lot at BOS that one could potentially do and see, so we prepared highlights to help you plan your itinerary.

 

The Knickerbocker Avenue Strange Science and Terror Radio Program Live Show. Courtesy of Sulphurbath Productions.

The Knickerbocker Avenue Strange Science and Terror Radio Program Live Show. Courtesy of Sulphurbath Productions.

 1. The Knickerbocker Avenue Strange Science and Terror Radio Program Inspired by old-timey radio shows like the infamous War tof the Worlds broadcast, this sci-fi radio show, now in its fourth episode, is performed to the sounds of a live orchestra and streamed straight to Facebook.

 Location: The Loom, 1087 Flushing Avenue, Bushwick Date: Saturday, October 1, 7:00 p.m.–11:00 p.m.

 

Sahana Ramakrishnan, Untitled (Self Portrait in a Bathtub), 2016. Courtesy of Sahana Ramakrishnan

Sahana Ramakrishnan, Untitled (Self Portrait in a Bathtub), 2016. Courtesy of Sahana Ramakrishnan

 2. 56 Bogart Street One of Bushwick’s more massive studio buildings, 56 Bogart deserves a slot on your BOS schedule for the sheer number of artists you can see under one roof. Among those in residence are Lisa Levy, who in January staged a Marina Abramović-inspired performance by sitting naked on the toilet at Bushwick’s Christopher Stout Gallery; Sahana Ramakrishnan, who creates mythology-infused mixed media paintings; and Rafael Fuchs, who is releasing a book of photos he took of the neighborhood between 2005 and 2011, titled Bushwick Forever_Volume I.

Also at 56 Bogart, on October 9 (3:00 p.m.–5:30 p.m.): Anthony Rosado will host a panel discussion titled “GentrifiConversation Acknowledging Complicity: Actions to Mend & End Arts-Induced Mass Displacement of Black & Brown Low Income Families.”

Location:56 Bogart Street, Bushwick
Date: September 30–October 2

 

Jeff Cylkowski, The Manipulation of Authenticity(2016). Courtesy of photographer Karen Mauch

Jeff Cylkowski, The Manipulation of Authenticity(2016). Courtesy of photographer Karen Mauch

 3. “Jeff Cylkowski: The Manipulation of Authenticity

Amani Olu curates this exhibition of the shimmering, layered, graffiti-inspired work of Jeff Cylkowski, who uses automotive paint to create his stunning abstract canvases.

Location: Storefront Ten Eyck (324 Ten Eyck Street, Bushwick)
Date: Friday, September 30, 6:00 p.m.–9:00 p.m.; October 1 and 2, 1:00 p.m. 6:00 p.m.

 

Debra Ramsay, Lichen and Lemon (2016) in “Hue[s]pace.” Courtesy of ODETTA.

Debra Ramsay, Lichen and Lemon (2016) in “Hue[s]pace.” Courtesy of ODETTA.

 4. Norte Maar + ODETTA present: “a white room”The premiere of choreographer Julia K. Gleich’snew ballet “a white room” will take place amid the gallery’s current exhibition of work by Debra Ramsay, a site-specific installation that hangs from the ceiling and spill across the floor, for a unique blend of art and performance.

Location: ODETTA, 229 Cook Street, Bushwick
Date: Saturday, October 1, 6:00 p.m. and 6:45 p.m.

 

Jeremy Nguyen, “Stranger Than Bushwick.” Courtesy of Jeremy Nguyen.

Jeremy Nguyen, “Stranger Than Bushwick.” Courtesy of Jeremy Nguyen.

 5. “005 Brooklyn Cartoonists and Illustrators

Check out work by up-and-coming Brooklyn illustrators and cartoonists Annelise Copasella, Jeremy Nguyen, Kaitlin Rae O’Connor, David Ostow, Ellis Rosen, Wizard Skull, Tony Wolf, and Lucio Zago. On Friday night, enjoy an open bar from Lagunitas and local shop Henry’s Wine and Spirit.

Location: Kave Espresso Bar, 119 Knickerbocker Avenue, Bushwick
Date: Friday, September 30, 6:30 p.m.–10:00 p.m., October 1 and 2

 

Anna Rindos mural. Courtesy of Paper Jam.

Anna Rindos mural. Courtesy of Paper Jam.

 6. Paper Jam Small Press Festival

Music venue Silent Barn plays host to this free print fair, which offers a party-like atmosphere with zines, comics, and other publications from small, local press creators.

Location: Silent Barn, 603 Bushwick Avenue, Bushwick
Date: Saturday, October 1, 12:00 p.m.–6:30 p.m.

 

Fiber-based work by Tessa Estelle Kramer. Courtesy of Tessa Estelle Kramer.

Fiber-based work by Tessa Estelle Kramer. Courtesy of Tessa Estelle Kramer.

 7. Bushwick Fine Art Handicraft Collective Inaugural ExhibitionThe inaugural exhibition from the B.H.F.A.C., a fiber art–based artist collective that looks to blur the line between art and craft, takes place a former textile mill. The opening night of the group show, featuring Tessa Estelle Kramer, Ella Hilsenrath and Liza Buzytsky, promises “conceptual snacks,” a communal fort to play in, and free zines with a performance by Cookie Tongue, billed as “Brooklyn’s folk fairy tale band.”

 Location: Shops at the Loom, 1087 Flushing Ave, BushwickDate: Friday, September 30, 2016 at 7:00 p.m.; October 1–2

 

Courtesy of Amy Talluto.

Courtesy of Amy Talluto.

 8. 1717 Troutman Street

Don’t miss this studio space with hundreds of artists, including Amy Talluto, a landscape artist; Jacklyn Brown, painter of retro-style cats; and Pablo Garcia Lopez, a neuroscience PhD who sculpts otherworldly “Silkworks” creations from natural mulberry fibers and spray foam.

Location: 1717 Troutman Street, Ridgewood
Date: October 1 and 2

 

 “Frankenstein Admires a Flower” promotional image. Courtesy of factoryartspace.

 “Frankenstein Admires a Flower” promotional image. Courtesy of factoryartspace.

 9. “Frankenstein Admires a Flower

Anonymous three-person art collective Poissonblanc, armed with a truckload of pedestals from the Guggenheim’s recent Fischli and Weiss exhibition, explores the various roles played by the plinth in contemporary art at this new gallery space. The show includes work by 15 artists from Bushwick, Los Angeles, and Canada.

Location: factoryartspace, 1630 Stephen St, Ridgewood
Date: October 1 and 2, 12:00 p.m.–7:00 p.m.

 

Joe Bochynski, Armadillo in Pink and Black Surrounded by Flower Petals, 2016.16. Excavated from condo development at 476 Woodward Ave. Ridgewood, NY. Possibly from the Otomi people. Courtesy of Joe Bochynski

Joe Bochynski, Armadillo in Pink and Black Surrounded by Flower Petals, 2016.16. Excavated from condo development at 476 Woodward Ave. Ridgewood, NY. Possibly from the Otomi people. Courtesy of Joe Bochynski

 10. The Active Space

Among the many studios on view is that of Joe Bochynski, who purports to have temporarily rented his space to the NYC Department of Archaeology so that they may present their recent finds. His mosaic “fragments” come with colorful, imagined histories.

 

Location: The Active Space, 566 Johnson Ave, Bushwick
Date: October 1 and 2

Bushwick Open Studios 2016 

Via ArtnetNews

Understanding Minimalism

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Introduction to Minimal Art

Minimal Art is a school of abstract painting and sculpture where any kind of personal expression is kept to a minimum, in order to give the work a completely literal presence. The resulting work is characterized by extreme simplicity of form and a deliberate lack of expressive content (source).

The central principle is that not the artist’s expression, but the medium and materials of the work are its reality (source). In other words: a work of art should not refer to anything other than itself (source). As minimalist painter Frank Stella once said: “What you see is what you see” (source).

Minimal Art emerged as a trend in the late 1950s and flourished particularly in the 1960s and 1970s (source). It is also referred to as ABC art, literal art (source), literalism (source), reductivism, and rejective art (source).

The rise

Through much of the 1950s, the dominant art movement in the United States was Abstract Expressionism. The expressionist artists seeked to express their personal emotions through their art.

A highly popular branch of Abstract Expressionism was called Action Painting. This was a style of painting in which paint is spontaneously dribbled, splashed or smeared onto the canvas (source).

In the early 1960′s, a new movement emerged; Minimal Art. The Minimalists felt that Action Painting (and as such, Abstract Expressionism) was too personal, pretentious and insubstantial. They rejected the idea that art should reflect the personal expression of its creator (source). Instead, they adopted the point of view that a work of art should not refer to anything other than itself (source). Their goal was to make their works totally objective, unexpressive, and non-referential.

One of the first painters to be specifically linked with Minimalism was (the former Abstract Expressionist) Frank Stella. Stella’s instantly acclaimed minimalist Black Paintings (1958-1960), in which regular bands of black paint were separated by very thin pinstripes of unpainted canvas (source), contrasted the emotional canvases of Abstract Expressionism (source).

The most prominent theorists were Donald Judd, who wrote the manifesto-like essay “Specific Objects” in 1964 (download) and Robert Morris, who wrote the three part essay “Notes on Sculpture 1-3″ in 1966 (download).

A historic moment for the art movement was the group exhibit “Primary Structures”, held in 1966 at the Jewish Museum in New York. Amongst others, it featured work of Donald Judd, Carl Andre, Dan Flavin, Sol LeWitt, Robert Morris, and Tony Smith (source) and really put Minimal Art as a name on the map.

Objectives

The minimalist artists wanted to allow the viewer an immediate, purely visual response (source) and let him experience all the more strongly the pure qualities of colour, form, space and materials (source). Minimalism sought to de-mystify art, to reveal its most fundamental character (source): the medium and materials of the work were its reality, and that is was what the artists wanted to portray (source). This concept of pure aestheticism was highly revolutionary at the time (source).

In order to achieve this, they attempted to remove all suggestions of self-expressionism from the art work (source), such as:

  • Composition
  • Complexity of form
  • Themes
  • Metaphorical associations, symbolism, suggestions of spiritual transcendence
  • Representation, reference or association
  • Meaning, sentiment, emotion
  • Social comment
  • Elements of traditional work
  • Any other signs of personal expression of the artist, his guiding hand or thought processes

From then on, all choices stem from the intention of giving the work a literal presence:

  • Use of unitary, geometric forms, as these could be mistaken neither for representations of the external world nor for the narrative of a story (source)
  • Use of monochromatic palettes of the primary colors, as these are the most basic and thus neutral of colors. Color was not used to express feeling or mood, but it simply to delineate space (source)
  • Use of plain, industrial, factory-made or store-bought, mass-produced materials, as these underscored the absence of the artist’s individual ‘mark’ (source). These modern materials also defy the traditional artistic materials (source). Materials were left raw or unaltered and were not intended to symbolize anything else (source).

The minimalist artists created objects that often blurred the boundaries between painting and sculpture (source). In this article, these two disciplines are still considered separately.

Sculpture

The minimalist sculptors were chiefly interested in how the viewer perceives the relationship between the different parts of the work, and of the parts to the whole thing. To highlight the subtle differences in this relationship (source), minimal ‘objects’ (as the artists preferred to call their sculptures) were often serial arrangements of extremely simple, geometric bodies such as cubes.

Sculptor Sol LeWitt once wrote that “the most interesting characteristic of the cube is that it is relatively uninteresting.” This comment speaks to what Minimalism aims to achieve, which is to use objects in and for themselves, and not as symbols or as representations (source).

The non-hierarchical character of the grid-based compositions challenged the notion of artistic originality (source), while the visual rhythms were strongly reminiscent of a production line (source).

Minimalist sculptures encouraged the viewer to be conscious of the space. The artwork was carefully arranged to emphasize and reveal the architecture of the gallery, often being presented on walls, in corners, or directly onto the floor (source). By eliminating the pedestal or base on which it sat, the minimalist sculptors sought to reject traditional sculpture. Minimalist sculpture shared common space as simply another object in the world. With no barrier between the audience and the artwork, viewers were forced to reconsider their relationship to the art object. Audiences could now interact with a piece on their own level, approaching, retreating, walking around it and sometimes even standing on it. (source)

Minimalist artist preferred industrial materials, prefabricated and/or mass-produced: fibreglass, Plexiglass, plastic, sheet metal, plywood, and aluminum. Steel, glass, concrete, wood and stone are also returning materials. The materials were either left raw (or hardly processed by the artist), or were solidly painted with bright industrial colours.

The result are objects of charged neutrality; objects that directly engage and interact with the particular space they occupy; objects that reveal everything about themselves, but little about the artist; objects whose subject is the viewer (source).

Well-know minimalist sculptors from the 1960′s and 1970′s:

For a comprehensive overview of all minimalist artists, please refer to my list of all famous minimalist artists, architects and designers.

 

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Untitled, by Donald Judd (1971). Material: Anodized aluminum. Size: 6 boxes of 48 x 48 x 48 inches each. Collection: Walker Art Center.


Untitled, by Donald Judd (1971). Material: Anodized aluminum. Size: 6 boxes of 48 x 48 x 48 inches each. Collection: Walker Art Center.

 “Equivalent VIII” by Carl Andre (1966). Material: firebricks. Size: 127 x 686 x 2292 mm. Collection: Tate Modern.

 “Equivalent VIII” by Carl Andre (1966). Material: firebricks. Size: 127 x 686 x 2292 mm. Collection: Tate Modern.

“Slope 2004″ by Carl Andre (1968). Material: Steel. Size: overall 0.5 x 204 x 38 inches. Collection: Walker Art Center.


“Slope 2004″ by Carl Andre (1968). Material: Steel. Size: overall 0.5 x 204 x 38 inches. Collection: Walker Art Center.

 “Two Open Modular Cubes/Half-Off”, by Sol LeWitt (1972). Material: Enameled aluminum. Size: 1600 x 3054 x 2330 mm. Collection: Tate Gallery, London

 “Two Open Modular Cubes/Half-Off”, by Sol LeWitt (1972). Material: Enameled aluminum. Size: 1600 x 3054 x 2330 mm. Collection: Tate Gallery, London

 Untitled, by Dan Flavin (1963). Material: Ultraviolet, blue fluorescent tubes and fixtures. Size: 8 x 96 x 4 inches. Collection: Walker Art Center

 Untitled, by Dan Flavin (1963). Material: Ultraviolet, blue fluorescent tubes and fixtures. Size: 8 x 96 x 4 inches. Collection: Walker Art Center

 “Free Ride”, by Tony Smith (1962). Material: Painted steel. Size: 6′ 8″ x 6′ 8″ x 6′ 8″. Collection: The Museum of Modern Art, New York.

 “Free Ride”, by Tony Smith (1962). Material: Painted steel. Size: 6′ 8″ x 6′ 8″ x 6′ 8″. Collection: The Museum of Modern Art, New York.

Painting

Like the minimalist sculptors, minimalist painters strived to create objects with presence, which can be seen at their basic physical appearance and appreciated at face value (source).

Minimalist paintings are usually precise and ‘hard-edged’, referring to the abrupt transitions between color areas. They incorporate geometric forms, often in repetitive patterns, resulting in flat, two-dimensional space.

Color areas are generally of one solid, unvarying color (source). Colors were normally unmixed, coming straight from the tube (source). The colour palette is often limited.

Through this use of only line, solid color, geometric forms and shaped canvas, the minimalist artists combined paint and canvas in such a way that the two became inseparable (source).

Well-know minimalist painters from the 1960′s and 1970′s:

For a comprehensive overview of all minimalist artists, please refer to my list of all famous minimalist artists, architects and designers.

 

 “The Marriage of Reason and Squalor, II”, by Frank Stella (1959). Material: Enamel on canvas. Size: 7′ 6 3/4″ x 11′ 3/4″ (230.5 x 337.2 cm). Collection: MoMA  

 “The Marriage of Reason and Squalor, II”, by Frank Stella (1959). Material: Enamel on canvas. Size: 7′ 6 3/4″ x 11′ 3/4″ (230.5 x 337.2 cm). Collection: MoMA

 

 “Harran II”, by Frank Stella (1967). Material: Polymer and fluorescent polymer paint on canvas. Size: 10 x 20 feet (304.8 x 609.6 cm). Collection: Guggenheim Museum, New York.  

 “Harran II”, by Frank Stella (1967). Material: Polymer and fluorescent polymer paint on canvas. Size: 10 x 20 feet (304.8 x 609.6 cm). Collection: Guggenheim Museum, New York.

 

 “Shoot”, by Kenneth Noland (1964). Material: Acrylic on canvas. Size: 103′ 3/4″ x 126′ 3/4″ (263.5 x 321.9 cm). Collection: Smithsonian American Art Museum Museum  

 “Shoot”, by Kenneth Noland (1964). Material: Acrylic on canvas. Size: 103′ 3/4″ x 126′ 3/4″ (263.5 x 321.9 cm). Collection: Smithsonian American Art Museum Museum

 

 “Twin”, by Robert Ryman (1966). Material: Oil on cotton. Size: 6′ 3 3/4″ x 6′ 3 7/8″ (192.4 x 192.6 cm). Collection: MoMA.  

 “Twin”, by Robert Ryman (1966). Material: Oil on cotton. Size: 6′ 3 3/4″ x 6′ 3 7/8″ (192.4 x 192.6 cm). Collection: MoMA.

 

“Red Green Blue”, by Ellsworth Kelly (1964). Material: Oil on canvas. Size: unframed 90 x 66 inches. Collection: Walker Art Center.


“Red Green Blue”, by Ellsworth Kelly (1964). Material: Oil on canvas. Size: unframed 90 x 66 inches. Collection: Walker Art Center.

Criticism

There seem to have been two main criticisms levelled at Minimal Art by the dominant art critics of the day.

Firstly, that it was somehow lacking in the aesthetic qualities that art was normally expected to reveal, thus lessening the experience of the viewer.

In his essay Recentness of Sculpture (1967), critic Clement Greenberg, champion of the Modernist art of the previous decades, dismissed Minimal Art as a ‘Novelty’ art. He suggested that the ‘aesthetic surprise’ a viewer experiences on looking at ‘true’ works of art is long lasting and important, while the novelty item provokes no more than a momentary surprise that is ‘superfluous’ (source).

The second main criticism was that Minimal Art blurred the boundaries between art and the every day, and so undervalued the art object.

In his article Art and Objecthood (1967), art critic Michael Fried published a controversial and influential attack on minimalist sculpture. Unlike Greenberg who saw Minimal art as merely novelty, Fried saw Minimalism as Modernism gone wrong. He suggested that if the aim of Modernist work was to explore its medium, be it paintings, sculpture or poetry, Minimal Art had taken this investigation too far, and by referring only to itself undermined the distinction between art and non-art (source).

Minimal Art today

By the late 1960s, Minimalism was beginning to show signs of breaking apart as a movement, as various artists who had been important to its early development began to move in different directions (source).

However, critics agree that Minimalism formed a “crux” or turning point in the history of modernism, and the movement remains hugely influential today (source). For an overview of contemporary artists holding a minimalist philosophy or minimalist aesthetic, please refer to my list of all famous minimalist artists, architects and designers.

Collections of Minimal Art

Many of the better art museums devoted to late 20th century works will have Minimal Art works in their collections.

Key collections of Minimal Art can be found at the following places:

Index

References

Yayoi Kusama’s ‘Infinity Mirrors’ Will Tour US, Guaranteeing a Blockbuster

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Yayoi Kusama at her show "I Who Have Arrived In Heaven," at David Zwirner Gallery in 2013. Photo Andrew Toth/Getty Images.

Yayoi Kusama at her show "I Who Have Arrived In Heaven," at David Zwirner Gallery in 2013. Photo Andrew Toth/Getty Images.

Get ready for a nationwide blockbuster: Beloved Japanese artist Yayoi Kusama will be the subject of an exhibition that will travel from coast to coast, opening at the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, in Washington, DC, before touching down at museums from Ontario to Los Angeles.

 Related: Take a Sneak Peek at Yayoi Kusama’s Hypnotic New Installation

The exhibition, surveying seven decades of the 87-year-old artist’s output, will feature no fewer than a half-dozen of her massively popular installation works, reports the Los Angeles Times. The so-called “infinity rooms,” consisting of mirrored rooms with strings of LED lights hanging from the ceilings, have drawn crowds around the world, with art lovers lining up for hours for a brief visit.

Related: Yayoi Kusama To Bring Her World-Renowned Infinity Polka Dots to Philip Johnson’s Glass House

The year 2014 “belonged to” Kusama in terms of global exhibition attendance, according to the Art Newspaper’s museum attendance report, which had her retrospective “Infinite Obsession” bringing in more than two million visitors in South and Central America. The polka dot- and mirror-obsessed artist’s engrossing installations dominate social media wherever they travel, with people wildly posting and liking photos of the easy-to-love immersive works.

Related: Yayoi Kusama Is the Most Popular Artist in The World

 

Yayoi Kusama, Infinity Mirrored Room. Courtesy of the Broad, Los Angeles.

Yayoi Kusama, Infinity Mirrored Room. Courtesy of the Broad, Los Angeles.

The upcoming US exhibition will almost certainly continue the artist’s string of hit shows, and will likely be a fixture on must-see lists for 2017.

Yayoi Kusama: Infinity Mirrors” will appear at the Smithsonian Institution’s Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, opening February 23, 2017. It will then appear at the Seattle Art Museum, June to September 2017; the Broad Museum from October 2017 to January 2018; and at the Art Gallery of Ontario in Toronto and the Cleveland Museum of Art, with dates to be determined.

 

 

via ArtNet News

The Art Books to Read This Summer

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Just in time for National Book Lover’s Day, celebrated on August 9, the editors of artnet News have rounded up an eclectic mix of art-related fiction and non-fiction. From Just Kids,Patti Smith‘s lyrical account of a legendary moment in the New York City art scene, to I Hate the Internet, Jarrett Kobek’s dynamic novel raging against the digital dystopia, here’s what we’re reading this summer.

 

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 Just Kids, by Patti Smith (2010)I’ve been catching up this summer on all the books my friends were talking about a couple of years ago, to be honest.

I read both of Ben Lerner’s infuriatingly good novels, Leaving the Atocha Station and 10:04. In the former, the narrator witnesses a museum-goer having “a profound experience with art” and worries that he is incapable of same, while in 10:04, Lerner proves himself to be a better art critic in passing than I am even on a good day; his commentary on Christian Marclay’s The Clock was, for me, more enjoyable than the piece itself.

Then, on a staycation, I read Donna Tartt’s super-entertaining The Goldfinch, in which a Carel Fabritius painting plays a central role in a tale of international intrigue. Now I’m halfway into Just Kids, Patti Smith’s reminiscences of her life with Robert Mapplethorpe. If you, like me until recently, still have these books on your bedside table, waiting to be read, well, get to it.

 

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 Before the Fall, by Noah Hawley (2016)The perfect beach read, Noah Hawley’s suspenseful novel tells the tale of the suspicious, fatal crash of a private plane leaving Martha’s Vineyard. Chartered by the head of a Fox News-style television station, the plane has only two survivors: A young boy and Scott Burroughs, an unsuccessful middle-aged painter whose apparently inexplicable presence aboard the ill-fated aircraft is ripe for conspiracy theory in the Malaysia Airlines-esque media blitz that follows the tragedy.

The nerve-racking tale is an undeniable page turner, but also does the art world justice with its description of its protagonist’s disappointing career trajectory, and interstitial chapters about Burroughs’s chilling, disaster-inspired canvases.

 

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 Keeping Their Marbles: How the Treasures of the Past Ended Up in Museums – And Why They Should Stay There, by Tiffany Jenkins (2016)

Tiffany Jenkins makes the (unpopular) case for the British Museumkeeping the Parthenon Marbles in this well-researched if not entirely-convincing critique. While Jenkins may be too quick to dismiss the concerns of those calling for restitution, she does an admirable job of examining the issue throughout history, including Napoleon’s extensive, oft-overlooked art looting. I particularly enjoyed the detailed history of the birth of museums in the UK, as well as Jenkins’s breakdown of the complicated issue of human remains in institutional collections.

Pair with Sharon Waxman’s excellent 2009 tome, Loot: The Battle Over the Stolen Treasures of the Ancient World, which generally makes the case for restitution, for a more thorough understanding of the issues at hand.

 

 

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 You Must Change Your Life: The Story of Rainer Maria Rilke and Auguste Rodin, by Rachel Corbett (2016)

This is, first of all, just a wonderfully readable work of art historical biography: Corbett manages to throw light not just on the central bromance between the author of Letters to a Young Poet and the sculptor of The Thinker, but also the whole social constellation around them, giving gracefully rendered intellectual portraits of woman like Paula Modersohn-Becker, Camille Claudel, and Lou Andreas-Salome.

But Corbett also tells this story through the prism of a concept: “Empathy,” a new psychological category that emerged in artistic discussion before finding its way into psychological vocabulary. The result is that this excavation of the dramas of this fin-de-siècle social scene is also the story of the coming-to-being of a whole way of thinking about what it means to be human, through art.

 

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 Naked by the Window: The Fatal Marriage of Carl Andre and Ana Mendieta, by Robert Katz (1990)

Striking the perfect balance between intrigue and fact, Naked by the Window is a gripping exploration of the mystery surrounding Cuban-born artist Ana Mendieta’s death and the question of whether her husband—famed Minimalist sculptor Carl Andre—is innocent or guilty.

Mendieta plunged to her death in 1985 after falling out of the window of the 34th floor of the Greenwich Village apartment she shared with Andre; he was subsequently charged with murder but was later acquitted due to lack of evidence. Published in 1990, just five years after Mendieta’s death, Naked by the Windowcontinues to maintain contemporary relevancy, as Andre remains an active member of the art world and protests are still staged today by the activist group WHEREISANAMENDIETA, most recently in June outside the Tate Modern, London.

 

 

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 Selected Writings (2000–2014), by Paul Chan(2014)

Artist, activist, and eternal social media skeptic Paul Chan knows how to seize a reader’s attention—and keep it. His anthology of essays, Selected Writings (2000–2014), offers up a satisfying collection of critical inquiries. There’s his seminal essay, “The Unthinkable Community;” various meditations on his favorite artists; and even a tongue-in-cheek commencement speech in which he condones student loan evasion.

His unwitting candor, perhaps, best explains why he can get away with contemplating Britney Spears and Lacanian psychoanalysis in the same paragraphic breath. If you, dear reader, are often struck by art world malaise, this one’s for you.

 

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 The Auctioneer, by Simon de Pury

The Auctioneer is a witty and entrancing look into the world of Simon de Pury, one that while filled with familiar names and places is still, somehow, an echelon apart.

Beginning with his tutelage under the famed Swiss art dealer and collector Ernst Beyeler (they were both from Basel), De Pury moved on to be the curator of the renowned collection of Baron Hans Heinrich Agost Gabor Tasso Thyssen-Bornemisza (“Baron Heini”) and then on to Sotheby’s where he ascended to the position of chairman of Sotheby’s Europe before breaking out on his own. If you have a taste for the art world at its most high-flying, this surprisingly candid (and at times self-searching) memoir will be hard to put down.

 

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 The Art Forger, B.A. Shapiro (2012)

In The Art Forger, by B.A. Shapiro, a famous Edgar Degas painting that was part of the massive—still unsolvedIsabella Stewart Gardner Museum heist in Boston in 1990, turns up at the studio of artist Claire Roth.

In what can only be deemed a Faustian bargain, she agrees to duplicate the work at the behest of a powerful dealer in exchange for a solo-show at his prestigious gallery. But things get even more thorny when she begins to suspect that the work, After The Bath, may not be the real deal to begin with.

 

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 Known and Strange Things, by Teju Cole(2016)

Teju Cole is the photography critic for the New York Times Magazine, as well as a wandering photographer himself. He’s a fan of fait divers, those weird and sometimes grim news items that are lodged into our consciousness by way of what Roland Barthes calls “a relation of causality.”

His latest book, Known and Strange Things: Essaysby Teju Cole, arrived on bookshelves August 9, and includes essays about artist and photographer Roy DeCarava, who collaborated with Langston Hughes, along with essays on poetry, travel, and finding your way “back into the light.” (Also, Punto d’Ombra, a book of Cole’s solo photography exhibition in Rome, will be published in English April 2017 as Blind Spot.)

 

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 Shocking, and Sometimes Strange Story of 150 Years of Modern Art, by Will Gompertz (2012)

Written by Will Gompertz, the former director of Tate Media at the Tate in the UK and current arts editor at the BBC, this book offers a compact and accessible introduction to the history of modern art and how the development of western art starting from Pre-Impressionism led to the contemporary art movement of the present day.

If you know very little about art history, this book will improve your understanding and give you a great overview. And even if you consider yourself an art history expert, you will still enjoy the well-written and entertaining narrative filled with interesting tales and anecdotes.

 

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 Diane Arbus: Portrait of a Photographer, by Arthur Lubow (2016)Released on June 7 (about a month before the Met Breuer’s exhibition of photographs from the “best seven years of her life,”) Arthur Lubow’s biographic book, Diane Arbus: Portrait of a Photographer, deep-dives into the connection between the photographer’s personal life and the lives of those reflected in her photographs. In drawn out interviews with close family members and friends, Lubow tells the story of the influential photographer, highlighting reasons why certain people fascinated her enough, and why we, as art lovers and people, are just as captivated by them.

 

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 I Hate the Internet: A Useful Novel Against Men, Money, and the Filth of Instagram, Jarrett Kobek (2016)Not strictly an art book, this fact-based novel of ideas taps directly into the real-life digital dystopia that produced Facebook and Google data mining and Trump-like troll culture.

Set in the fully gentrified San Francisco of 2013, I Hate the Internet takes on the following urgent questions and more: “Why do we applaud the enrichment of CEOs at the expense of the weak and the powerless,” “Why are giving away our intellectual property” and “Why is activism in the 21st century nothing more than a series of morality lectures typed into devices built by slaves?”

Kobek’s been called the American Houllebecq, but I prefer to think of him as our era’s Paddy Chayefsky—the writer of Network. He’s mad as hell and he’s not going to take it anymore. Neither should we.

Via  ArtNet

12 Fascinating Facts About Jellyfish

tom is not a boy

1. Some jellyfish can glow in the dark

Many jellyfish have bioluminescent organs, which emit light. This light may help them in a number of different ways, like attracting prey or distracting predators.

2. Jellyfish can clone themselves

If a jellyfish is cut in two, the pieces of the jellyfish can regenerate and create two new organisms. Similarly, if a jellyfish is injured, it may clone itself and potentially produce hundreds of offspring.

 

3. Some jellyfish are immortal

There are two phases to jelly life: the stationary polyp stage and the mobile medusa phase. It's the medusa phase that we're usually referring to when we talk about jellyfish. Typically, jellies start as polyps and develop into medusas, but the Turritopsis nutricula has earned it the nickname "the immortal jellyfish" for having the ability to travel backward to the polyp stage in times of stress.

4. Jellyfish can teach us about efficient underwater propulsion

The movements of bell-shaped jellyfish have provided researchers with a new understanding of propulsion. The flexibility of their umbrella-like bodies allow them to pulse upwards and downwards without expending much energy. Researchers have created biomimetic robots with flexible bells, which may one day lead to better undersea vehicles.

 

5. Jellyfish are a boon to cancer research.

Green fluorescent proteins (GFPs) from the Aequorea victoria jellyfish species have transformed bio-medical research. The glow-in-the-dark proteins can illuminate specific proteins within the human body to track microscopic activity (for instance, cancer growth).

6. There's a giant jellyfish called the pink meanie

The scientific name for this jelly is Drymonema larsoni, but its aggressive sting and distinctive color have earned it the nickname "pink meanie."

7. Jellyfish don't have brains

Instead, jellyfish have nerve nets which sense changes in the environment and coordinate the animal's responses. Jellyfish are boneless, brainless and heartless. #spineless #trump #justsayin

8. Jellyfish movements inspired a new way to fly

It's probably not that surprising that jellyfish have served as inspiration for swimming robots. However, it's more unusual to see a sea creature inspire a flying machine, but that's just what happened at New York University.

9. Jellyfish powder has been used to make salted caramel

Turtles eat jellyfish, and larger jellies may eat smaller ones, but are jellyfish fit for human consumption? A group of high school students in Japan came up with a salted caramel recipe that uses powered jellyfish. It's not vegan for sure, but it is one way to deal with an invasive jellyfish bloom.

 

10. Jellyfish will eat peanut butter

Two Aquarists in Dallas, Texas created a saltwater/peanut butter mix and fed it to moon jellies. Apparently, the jellies found this mix to be an acceptable source of protein. "We would love to claim we conducted this trial with noble purpose, but the truth is that we just wanted to make peanut butter and jellyfish simply to see if it could be done," the researchers write.

 

11. One variety’s tentacles can grow over 90 feet long.

The largest jellyfish species, the lion’s mane jellyfish (Cyanea capillata), can have tentacles that extend longer than a blue whale, the largest mammal on Earth.

12. A rare jelly is one of the largest invertebrate predators in the deep sea ecosystem.

Using a remotely operated vehicle (ROV), scientist captured a video of the huge Stygiomedusa gigantea.

The jellyfish has a disc-shaped bell than can be a metre wide, and has four arms that extend up to six metres in length.

The jellyfish has only been seen 114 times in the 110 years it has been known to science, say researchers.

Professor Mark Benfield from Louisiana State University in Baton Rouge, US, came across the creature as part of the Serpent project, a collaboration between marine scientists and energy companies, including BP, Shell, Chevron and Petrobras, working in the Gulf of Mexico.

 

Still want to know more? We recommend JellyBiologist

The Neon Glow of Tokyo’s Nightlife Captured

tom is not a boy

All images via @liamwon9  

All images via @liamwon9

 

Art Director Liam Wong spends his days directing the visual identity of video games at Ubisoft, while his nights are spent exploring the neon-splashed streets of his city of Tokyo. Wong places these images, that seem to mimic the appearance of a video game themselves, on Instagram. Here he has a huge archive that explores how the digital has embedded itself within the landscape of Tokyo’s streets, meshing reality with flashing LED lights, scrolling messages, and neon signs. You can also see more of Wong’s imagery on his Facebook, and Society6 where you can buy his prints. (via My Modern Met).

 

 

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